Niicugni


Niicugni
Emily Johnson / Catalyst (USA)

There is this idea of place holding everything—things that happened before, people that used to be here, everything that is happening right now, and everything that will happen. The past and future in the present, and if we pay close enough attention, we can see it all at once. Layers upon layers. Worlds within worlds. Niicugni is the word that directs us to pay attention, to listen. Niicugni is the dance of everyone who has danced here, including our ancestors, whose bones in the ground beneath us support our bones as we dance here now.

“A stunning example of an emerging contemporary American aesthetic”
Houston Chronicle

 
70 minutes
Emily Johnson will participate in SPAN on January 16 at 12pm at the COIL HUB.


Commissioned by PS122, co-presented with Baryshnikov Arts Center

Jan 9 – 12 7:30pm

Please note there will be no late seating.

Baryshnikov Arts Center
Howard Gilman Performance Space: 450 W. 37th St., Manhattan

$20
Purchase Tickets
BacNYC.org

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Emily Johnson is an artist and writer who makes body-based work. Originally from Alaska, she is currently based in Minneapolis. Her dances function as installations, engaging audiences within and through a space and environment – interacting with a place’s architecture, history, and role in community. She works to blur distinctions between performance and daily life and to create work that reveals and respects multiple perspectives.

 

Emily received a 2012 Bessie Award for Outstanding Performance for her work, The Thank-you Bar at New York Live Arts. She is a 2012 Headlands Artist in Residence and Alpert/MacDowell Colony recipient, a 2011 Native Arts and Cultures Fellow, a 2012, 2010 and 2009 MAP Fund Grant recipient, and a 2009 McKnight Fellow. Niicugni, the second in a trilogy that began with The Thank-you Bar, tours through 2013 to the Maggie Allesee National Center for Choreography/Florida State University, Coil Festival/Baryshnikov Arts Center, Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Northrop Auditorium/Women of Substance Series, Bunnell St. Gallery in Alaska, RedFern Arts Center/Keene College with Vermont Performance Lab, ASU/Gammage, and TigerTail.

 

Emily is of Yup’ik descent and is a shareholder in the Calista Native Corporation. Her family is from Bethel and Akiak, Alaska and she was raised on the Kenai Peninsula.
 

Baryshnikov Arts Center is the realization of a long-held vision by artistic director Mikhail Baryshnikov, who sought to build an arts center in New York City that would serve as a gathering place for artists from all disciplines. BAC’s opening in 2005 heralded the launch of this mission, establishing a thriving creative space for artists from around the world. Located in the Hudson Yards neighborhood of Manhattan, BAC comprises a total of 20,000 square feet, including the 238-seat Jerome Robbins Theater, which opened in 2010; the Howard Gilman Performance Space, a black box performance space seating 136 people; four column-free studios; and office space. BAC serves approximately 500 artists and more than 22,000 audience members annually through presentations and artist residencies.
 
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Baryshnikov Arts Center is located in Chelsea, Manhattan and is accessible by the A, C, E, 1, 2 and 3 subways. This historic region on the west side of Manhattan is home to the High Line, the Chelsea Historic District, the Fashion Institute of Technology and is an international shopping and art gallery destination. Baryshnikov Arts Center sits two blocks from the Hudson River, close to 9th avenue where audiences can pick from a plethora of bars and restaurants scattered between 37th and 42th streets. BAC is also six blocks southwest of Times Square, a tourist hotspot and shopping destination.
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Concept, choreography, writing, and direction Emily Johnson
Created in collaboration and performed by Emily Johnson, Aretha Aoki, James Everest, Heidi Eckwall, Bethany Lacktorin
Music composition and sound design James Everest and Bethany Lacktorin
Lighting design Heidi Eckwall
Costumes Angie Vo
Creative and administrative assistant Max Wirsing
Stage design Emily Johnson and James Everest
Fish-skin lanterns created by volunteers in Minneapolis, Vermont, Alaska, and California


Lead commissioning and developmental support provided by the Maggie Allesee National Center for Choreography with additional anchor developmental and commissioning support provided by Vermont Performance Lab and PS122. Niicugni is a National Performance Network (NPN) Creation Fund Project co-commissioned by PS122 in partnership with the Maggie Allesee National Center for Choreography, Portland Institute of Contemporary Art, Tigertail, Northrop Concerts and Lectures at the University of Minnesota, and NPN. Major contributors of NPN are the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Ford Foundation, Nathan Cummings Foundation, MetLife Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts (a federal agency). More information: npnweb.org. Made possible with support from the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation, The MAP Fund, and the National Dance Project. Major support for NDP is provided by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, with additional support from the Community Connections Fund of the MeTLife Foundation. Operating support was funded by the New England Foundation for the Arts with funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. A production residency was supported by NDP with funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation at Mass MoCA. Niicugni is underwritten by the American Composers Forum’s Live Music for Dance Minnesota program in partnership with the American Music Center, with funds provided by the McKnight Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and is funded by the National Native Artist Exchange, a program of the NEFA, made possible with funding from the Ford Foundation, the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation, and Anonymous donors. Additional presentation support provided by Mertz Gilmore Foundation, Harkness Foundation for Dance and Jerome Robbins Foundation. Residency support provided by Vermont Performance Lab, with support from the Dance To Go Fund from the McKnight Foundation, The Arts Collaboration Lab, with support from PS122 & Columbia University, Arizona State University, and the Headlands Center for the Arts.

The Curators’ Piece (A Trial Against Art)


The Curators’ Piece (A Trial Against Art)
Tea Tupajić + Petra Zanki (CROATIA)

Working in partnership with an international team of curators, who not only serve as the cast but also as presenters of an international tour of the work, Tea Tupajić (direction, lighting) and Petra Zanki (dramaturgy, choreography) present The Curators’ Piece (A Trial Against Art) as a “trial” against art and its protagonists, challenging the utopian ideal of the responsibility of art to a wider society. Charges are raised against all participants: the artists who create a piece, the curators responsible for presenting the work, and the audience.
 
“Six curators take turn on the bench of the accused and get to speak in defense of art and try to prove what it is capable of – that a world without art is a dead world – it is convincing.”
Dagens Nyheter
 
75 minutes
Tea Tupajić, Petra Zanki and Florian Malzachar will participate in SPAN on January 15 at 12pm at the COIL HUB.


Commissioned by PS122, co-presented with Dixon Place

Jan 14 7pm
Jan 15 6pm

Dixon Place: 161-A Chrystie St., Manhattan

$20 / $15 students, seniors
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Tea Tupajić (Sarajevo, 1984) is a Croatian theatre director. As an independent artist she works on theater and gallery projects. In the period 2010-2012 creates “The Curators’ Piece” in collaboration with Petra Zanki and several performances and conferences as a part of “The agora project” initiated by Jan Ritsema. Her projects are presented in venues/festivals such as BIT Teatergarasjen (Bergen), Bastard (Trondheim), TUPP festival (Uppsala), Tanzquartier Wien (Vienna), Kaaitheater (Brussels), steirischer herbst (Graz), PACT Zollverein (Essen)… Guest editor for the magazine Frakcija. Published in various magazines. Lectures and contributes to conferences internationally.
 
Petra Zanki is a performance and dance maker born in Split. After graduation at the University of Arts and Philosophy in Zagreb, she continued her studies at the Sorbonne Nouvelle in Paris (UFR Theatre et Arts du Spectacle). She is co-founder of Banana Gerila and ekscena within with she has led many projects with Croatian and International artists. As both author and performer she has worked with Oliver Frljić, Borut Šeparović (Montažstroj), Shadow Casters and Via Negativa. Her texts have been published in the journals Kretanja, Kazalište and Frakcija. In 2010, together with Britta Wirthmüller, she won first prize at Young Choreographers Platform of Croatia. 2012- 2013. Petra obtained a scholarship SPAZIO led by Choreographic arts centre (ICK) of Emio Greco/PC, Amsterdam. She lives in Zagreb where she is artist-in-residence in Zagreb Dance Center.

 

Dixon Place is a non-profit organization founded in1986 to provide a space for literary and performing artists to create and develop new works in front of a live audience. While other venues of its kind have since died off, or now only present established artists, Dixon Place remains at the heart of the New York experimental performance scene. Taking risks is crucial to the life of Dixon Place, its artists and audiences.
 
Dixon Place’s primary commitments are to bring artists and audiences together through live performance in order to expand the understanding of the creative process and its final product, and to provide a supportive environment for emerging artists to present new work. Over the years, Dixon Place has successfully maintained its intimate atmosphere and unique environment while increasing its programming to fulfill the need for performance opportunities for the New York community of performing and literary artists.
 
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Dixon Place is located on the Lower East Side of Manhattan and is accessible by the F, J, Z, 6, M, B, and D subways. This well-known region is home to the Tenement Museum and the New Museum of Contemporary Art. Dixon Place sits one block from Bowery Street, where visitors can find the Bowery Ballroom – and alternative venue boasting live music every night of the week. The Clinton Street restaurant row is only three blocks east of the theater and is complete with pizzerias, tapas restaurants, and local bars.
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Directed by Tea Tupajic
Dramaturgy, Choreography Petra Zanki
Performed by Vallejo Gantner, Sven Age Birkeland, Florian Malzacher, Per Ananiassen, Gundega Laivina & Priit Raud.


Presented with support from the Trust for Mutual Understanding. Made possible with commissioning support from PS122; BIT Teatergarasjen, Norway; BUDA; Teaterhuset Avantgarden; MDT; Grant Theatre Groningen; and O Espaço do Tempo. Research supported by PACT Zollverein, On the Boards, and Steirischer Herbst. Additional support provided by the City Council, Zagreb and Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Croatia and the Goethe-Institut New York.

Magical

Magical
Annie Dorsen & Anne Juren (USA, AUSTRIA)

Magical, a collaboration between Juren (performer) and Dorsen (director), places the canon of historical feminist performance into the context of a magic show. Through the rituals of illusion, trickery, and transformation the audience is shown the contradictions of contemporary feminism, contemporary art by women, and the contemporary female body. Juren devotes herself to the efficacy of the female body – a body that is (in a way) liberated, yet embattled (but isn’t supposed to be).Please note this performance contains nudity.
 
“Dorsen generates rare intellectual stimulation for the downtown performance world.”
The Village Voice

 
55 minutes
Annie Dorsen and Kevin Slavin will participate in SPAN on January 17 at 12pm at the COIL HUB.


Co-presented with New York Live Arts

Jan 15, 17 – 18 7:30pm
Jan 19 6pm

New York Live Arts: 219 W. 19th St., Manhattan

$30 / $15 students, seniors
Purchase Tickets
Newyorklivearts.org

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Anne Juren (1978, Grenoble, France) is a choreographer and dancer based in Vienna. After her diploma of dance at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Danse de Lyon and her studies of French literature at the Sorbonne, she finished her apprenticeship at the Trisha Brown Company in New York in 2000. She founded the association Wiener Tanz- und Kunstbewegung in Vienna and created several choreographies like the solo “A?” (2003), “J’aime” (2004) in collaboration with Alice Chauchat, the solo “Code Series” (2005), “Look Look” (2007) in collaboration with Kroot Juurak, and the group piece “Komposition” (2008). In 2008 she was also artist in residence at the Tanzquartier Wien and took part in the two European artistic programs IDEE and APAP in which she developped a series of works called “Patterns of Sport and Dance”. 2009, she worked as a choreographer for the Burgtheater and co-curated the festival “Quick Change” at the Tanzquartier Wien in Vienna. In 2010 she presented with DD Dorvillier and Annie Dorsen “Pièce Sans Paroles”, a Tenessee Williams’s piece for two characters performed without words, and premiered in collaboration with Annie Dorsen and her magic piece “Magical” at the Impulstanz Festival. Her latest work “Tableaux Vivants” was a collaboration with the fine artist Roland Rauschmeier and the Austrian composer Johannes Maria Staud which premiered in November 2011 in the TQW in cooperation with Tanzquartier Wien and WIEN MODERN. In the moment she works on “Lost and Found”, a choreographic work reflecting upon the interplay of memory, projection and factual events which is going to be on stage by the end of 2012. Recently Anne Juren is a Feldenkrais® practitioner.
 
Annie Dorsen works in a variety of fields, including theatre, film, dance and, as of 2010, digital performance. Most recently, “Hello Hi There” premiered at the steirischer herbst festival (Graz), and was presented at Black Box Teatre (Oslo), BIT Teatergarasjen (Bergen), Hebbel am Ufer (Berlin) and PS122 (New York). She is the co-creator of the 2008 Broadway musical “Passing Strange”, which she also directed. Spike Lee has made a film of her production which screened at various film festivals before being released theatrically by IFC in 2010. Also in 2010, she collaborated with choreographer Anne Juren on “Magical” (ImPulsTanz Festival) and with Ms. Juren and DD Dorviller on “Pièce Sans Paroles” (brut Künstlerhaus, Vienna and Rencontres Choréographiques Internationales Seine-St-Denis, Bagnolet). In 2009 she created two music-theatre pieces, “Ask Your Mama”, a setting of Langston Hughes’ 1962 poem, composed by Laura Karpman and sung by Jessye Norman and The Roots (Carnegie Hall) and ETHEL’s Truckstop, seen at the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave Festival. Her pop-political performance project “Democracy in America” was presented at PS122 in spring 2008. Her short film, “I Miss”, originally the centerpiece of “Democracy in America”, has screened at American Film Institute Festival (AFI Fest), SXSW Film Festival, The New York Film Festival’s ‘Views From the Avant-Garde’ and the Nantucket Film Festival. Upcoming: “Spoken Karaoke” within The Truth is Concrete at steirischer herbst festival 2012 and a new algorithmic work, “The False Peach” at On the Boards in February 2013.
 
Annie Dorsen has appeared at PS122 with Hello Hi There as a part of COIL 2012, and Democracy in America in 2008.

 

Located in the heart of Chelsea in New York City, New York Live Arts is an internationally recognized destination for innovative movement-based artistry offering audiences access to art and artists notable for their conceptual rigor, formal experimentation and active engagement with the social, political and cultural currents of our times. At the center of this identity is Bill T. Jones, Executive Artistic Director, a world-renowned choreographer, dancer, theater director and writer.
 
We commission, produce and present performances in our 20,000 square foot home, which includes a 184-seat theater and two 1,200 square foot studios that can be combined into one large studio. New York Live Arts serves as home base for the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company, provides an extensive range of participatory programs for adults and young people and supports the continuing professional development of artists. Our influence extends beyond NYC through our international cultural exchange program that currently places artists in Eastern Europe, the Middle East and Africa.
 
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New York Live Arts is located in Chelsea, Manhattan and is accessible by the A, C, E, L, M, F, 1, 2 and 3 subways. This historic region on the west side of Manhattan is home to the High Line, the Chelsea Historic District, the Fashion Institute of Technology and is an international shopping and art gallery destination. New York Live Arts sits between 7th and 8th Aves on 19th street where audiences can pick from Spanish cuisine, seafood, or sushi within a 2 block radius. Audiences interested a post-performance walk can head 6 blocks south to Jackson Square where there are a range of late-night indulgences from coffee shops to wine bars.
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Realisation Annie Dorsen and Anne Juren
Performance Anne Juren
Magician Steve Cuiffo
Music Christophe Demarthe
Stage Roland Rauschmeier
Stage assistant Sebastian Bauer
Light Bruno Pocheron with Ruth Waldeyer
Costume Miriam Draxl
Assistant Ruth Ranacher


Supported, in part, by the Harkness Foundation for Dance, the Jerome Robbins Foundation, the Mertz Gilmore Foundation, the Austrian Cultural Forum (New York City), the Cultural Department of the City of Vienna and the Austrian Federal Ministry for Education, Arts and Culture.

Hot Box

Hot Box
Brian Rogers (USA)

Hot Box is a companion piece to Rogers’ 2010 Bessie-nominated performance Selective Memory. Where Selective Memory was extremely clean and minimalist, Hot Box is loud, foggy, sweaty, and drunk. Inspired by films like Apocalypse Now and Fitzcarraldo, Hot Box is a live performance situation that is violent and chaotic; from that chaos, attempts to compose a sequence of video images that are quiet, sustained, focused, and organized – yet coated with an emotional residue.
 
“There will be haze, flashing lights, loud noises. There will be docents to guide you, should you need to escape…”
The New York Times
 

60 minutes
Brian Rogers will participate in SPAN on January 18 at 12pm at the COIL HUB.


Co-presented with The Chocolate Factory

Jan 12, 14, 15 8pm
Jan 13 6pm

The Chocolate Factory: 5-49 49th Ave., Long Island City

$15
Purchase Tickets
Chocolatefactorytheater.org

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Brian Rogers is a director, video artist, co-founder and artistic director of The Chocolate Factory Theater. Since 1997, Brian has conceived and/or directed numerous large scale theatrical performances at The Chocolate Factory and elsewhere including the Bessie-nominated Selective Memory (2010/11) redevelop (death valley) (2009), 2 Husbands (2007), and Gun Play (2006). His newest performance work Hot Box will premiere in September 2012 as part of FIAF’s Crossing the Line festival; and he will show new video work at Ventana 244 Gallery in November 2012. In addition to his own work, Brian curates The Chocolate Factory’s Visiting Artist Program (now in its 7th year) which supports the work of more than 100 theater, dance, music and multimedia artists each year. As a video and performance artist, Brian has collaborated with numerous dance and theater artists including Shaun Irons and Lauren Petty (the horror the horror, Movement Research Festival 2010, Abrons Arts Center 2011), Aynsley Vandenbroucke (Danspace Project, March 2011) Tara O’Con (Danspace Project, January 2009), Jillian Sweeney (September 2009), and the Movement Research Spring 2008 Festival (24x4x4). Recent video works include The Borden Avenue Bridge Project, presented at NY Designs in May 2008. He is a graduate of Bennington College.
 

 

The OBIE Awarding-winning Chocolate Factory Theater values the process of creation and the spirit of experimentation; and is a leading incubator for new developments in experimental performance. The Factory’s 5,000 square foot facility is home to new work by the company’s Founding Artists; and provides support to over 100 Visiting Artists each year. The work of The Chocolate Factory’s founding artists emphasizes multi-disciplinary collaboration combining movement, music, video and text to devise a means of storytelling that is immediate, collage-like, highly visual, and dependent on new technologies. When successful, the work is not easily categorized as theater, dance, new music, or video art and is rather a thorough intermingling of these disciplines. By extension, our curatorial values when it comes to Visiting Artists leads to work that exists across or between disciplines-work that requires new methods, more time, and a new kind of audience.

 

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The Chocolate Factory is located in Long Island City, at the first stop on both the 7 and G trains into Queens. L.I.C. is a waterfront neighborhood which in recent years has become known for its thriving arts community, and has among the highest concentration of art galleries, art institutions (among them MOMA’s PS1, the Institute of the Moving Image, Socrates Sculpture Park, Isamu Noguchi Museum) and studio space of any neighborhood in New York City.

 

Concept, Direction, Choreography, Video, Sound, Performance Brian Rogers
Director of Photography, Performance Madeline Best
Technology Design Mike Rugnetta
Set Design Brad Kisicki
Lighting Design Jon Harper
Costume Design Maggie Dick


Major production support provided by the Map Fund, a program of Creative Capital supported by the Doris Duke Charitable FOundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Additional commissioning support provided by NYSCA’s Individual Artist Program. Hot Box was shown in progress at Mount Tremper Arts. Hot Box premiered at the Chocolate Factory in September 2012 as part of the Crossing the Line festival. Additional presentation support from Mertz Gilmore Foundation, Harkness Foundation for Dance and Jerome Robbins Foundation.

There There


There There
Kristen Kosmas (USA)

“Nobody, and I mean nobody, holds a candle to writing. No gimmicks, no flash just sheer poetic brilliance” – Andy Horwitz, Culturebot

Christopher Walken, on tour in Russia with a solo show inspired by everyone’s favorite Chekhovian sociopath, mysteriously falls off a ladder and is unable to perform. Karen, who apparently proofread the script once, is asked to go on in Walken’s place. A precarious bilingual performance duet ensues between Karen and her Russian interpreter, Leo. There There is a wildly unpredictable theatrical roller coaster about being the completely wrong person in the totally wrong place at the exact wrong time doing all the most wrong things. Directed by Paul Willis, performed by Kristen Kosmas & Larissa Tokmakova, design by Peter Ksander, translation by Matvei Yankelevich.

TRANSPORTATION NOTE: 7 trains from Manhattan are NOT running this weekend. As an alternate, take the N, Q train to Queensboro Plaza and then the free shuttle bus to Vernon Blvd-Jackson Ave. You can also find more alternate routes here: www.mta.info

Co-commissioned & presented by Performance Space 122
& The Chocolate Factory

Dec 18 – 22 8pm
Jan 3 – 5 8pm
Jan 9 – 11 8pm
Jan 12 at 6pm
PERFORMANCES ADDED!
Jan 10 at 10pm
Jan 11 at 10pm

$20 / $15 students, seniors (at door)
Purchase Tickets
Chocolatefactorytheater.org

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Playwright and performer Kristen Kosmas and director Paul Willis have collaborated on numerous projects over the last 15 years, including her solo performance play The Scandal!, which received critical acclaim in Seattle and was nominated for a New York Independent Theater Award for Best Short Script in 2009. Kosmas’ plays and solo performances have been produced in Seattle, Austin, Boston, Chicago, and in numerous venues in New York. Kosmas is a founding member of the OBIE Award-winning performance series Little Theater; the Brooklyn-based experimental writer’s collective Machiqq/The Ladies’ Auxiliary Playwriting Team; and The Twenty-Five Cent Opera of San Francisco, a monthly event for the enactment of texts and theatricals.

The Chocolate Factory is Long Island City based incubator for new developments in experimental performance. The work of founding artists Brian Rogers & Sheila Lewandowski emphasizes collaboration combining movement, music, video and text to devise a means of storytelling that is immediate, collage-like, highly visual, and dependent on new technologies. These curatorial values tend to lead to work that is not easily categorized and requires new methods, more time, and a new kind of audience.

 

“It feels a little bit like the first New York I knew in the ’70s and ’80s. Not in a retro way at all, but art and residence and commerce were in a more balanced relationship than they are now. It’s not a reference to that time, just a little place where that is occurring again.” – Tere O’Connor, in a New York Times profile of the Chocolate Factory


The Chocolate Factory is located in Long Island City, at the first stop on both the 7 and G trains into Queens. L.I.C. is a waterfront neighborhood which in recent years has become known for its thriving arts community, and has among the highest concentration of art galleries, art institutions (among them MOMA’s PS1, the Institute of the Moving Image, Socrates Sculpture Park, Isamu Noguchi Museum) and studio space of any neighborhood in New York City.

Playwright/Performer Kristen Kosmas
Director Paul Willis
Translator Matvei Yankelevich
Designer Peter Ksander
Performer Larissa Tokmakova



Made possible with commissioning support from PS122, The Chocolate Factory, and the Jerome Foundation. Developed in residencies at NACL Theater and Abrons Art Center.


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