FRAGMENTED BODY PERCEPTIONS AS HIGHER VIBRATION FREQUENCIES TO GOD

Wet ash falls from the ceiling. It slowly empties into an algae filled stream surrounded by moss covered boulders and gravel. Responding to last year’s brutal mood of apocalypse and rapture–the pandemic and repeating horrors of Black death– Precious Okoyomon’s installation creates an ecosystem that seeks to hold grief. Visitors are invited to sit or stand or lay down in the uncomfortable space of mourning that we so often avoid.

The main material here is the ash from the incinerated kudzu, grown for Okomoyon’s most recent exhibition, Earthseed, at the MMK in Frankfurt. The vine, originally from Japan, was used to prevent soil erosion resulting from the cultivation of cotton during slavery; a bandage intended to cover up the environmental tolls of slavery, it instead proliferated, and became known as “the vine that ate the south.”

With FRAGMENTED BODY PERCEPTIONS AS HIGHER VIBRATION FREQUENCIES TO GOD Okoyomon turns the Keith Haring Theatre into a wake for Black death allowing for catharsis, celebration, and closing: “2020 was the reckoning of death, and we’re still living in it. We have to face it and live in it and allow it to change us and be changed by it.”

 

Precious Okoyomon, FRAGMENTED BODY PERCEPTIONS AS HIGHER VIBRATION FREQUENCIES TO GOD is made possible in part by grant from the National Performance Network.

Photo courtesy of the artist.

Coming Soon

Slipping Into Darkness

 
As a week-long performance-installation, Tolentino’s new durational work, Slipping Into Darkness, plays out in both the Day and the Night. In the daylight of the winter sun, movers breathe, labor, and shift while sheathed under the cover of a thick “horizon” made from leather, scented oils, reflective surfaces, and dense sound. In the evening, participants join in an intimate one-to-one exchange immersed in a dark pool of mineral water. Working with and below these evocative opaque surfaces, Tolentino reaches for the sensual, the subjective excess of each encounter. Loss tenders refuge. Space and time open to the accounts of Othersthe imprecisely labeled, unseen, or overlookedand the inspiring visionaries who thrive as not-of-this-world future-makers. Tolentino tunes us into spaces that generously blur yet ignite our shadowy interiors and fugitive poetics with time’s future-past to float with that which falls in and out of grasp.
 
This project will be accompanied by .bury.me.fiercely.—a 35-minute special late night performance on Dec 12th at 10pm by Julie Tolentino and Stosh Fila.
 

 

Commissioned by Performance Space New York.


 

farsa

 
With her work farsa (engl. farce), the Brazilian artist Renata Lucas creates “a theatre that performs itself” generating a montage of space and perception that disarms dynamics of totality. A large hanging curtain that spans across Performance Space’s main theatre—within which two smaller curtains are embedded—rotates and opens up passageways when activated by the viewer. As bodies move through the work, their limbs appear as disembodied pieces cutting through perceived truths and assumptions, leaving us in a state of farcical reality where nothing is static or stable. With farsa, Lucas alludes to the current political situation in Brazil, where totalitarian currents attempt to reshape rights and liberties and disembody established values and moral systems. 
 

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

© Renata Lucas. Courtesy the artist and Galeria Luisa Strina, São Paulo; A Gentil Carioca, Rio de Janeiro; neugerriemschneider, Berlin

Slipping Into Darkness

 
As a week-long performance-installation, Tolentino’s new durational work, Slipping Into Darkness, plays out in both the Day and the Night. In the daylight of the winter sun, movers breathe, labor, and shift while sheathed under the cover of a thick “horizon” made from leather, scented oils, reflective surfaces, and dense sound. In the evening, participants join in an intimate one-to-one exchange immersed in a dark pool of mineral water. Working with and below these evocative opaque surfaces, Tolentino reaches for the sensual, the subjective excess of each encounter. Loss tenders refuge. Space and time open to the accounts of Othersthe imprecisely labeled, unseen, or overlookedand the inspiring visionaries who thrive as not-of-this-world future-makers. Tolentino tunes us into spaces that generously blur yet ignite our shadowy interiors and fugitive poetics with time’s future-past to float with that which falls in and out of grasp.
 
This project will be accompanied by .bury.me.fiercely.—a 35-minute special late night performance on Dec 12th at 10pm by Julie Tolentino and Stosh Fila.
 

Commissioned by Performance Space New York.

A Famine of Hearing

 
Zapata invites you to enter and linger in her large-scale textile installation—handwoven, hand-tufted, and sewn into shapes and textures that are a bit misshapen, and refreshingly different from familiar everyday objects. Zapata’s objects can hold our fantasies. They form a landscape in which we can spend time and experience ourselves with other bodies. Through the excess of labor put into this work, Zapata conveys an amorphous sense of time, honoring tradition with untraditional aspects of existence and queerness. This approach also mirrors Zapata’s complex identity: a Texan living in Brooklyn, a lesbian raised as evangelical Christian, a first-generation American of Latin American descent, whose work is inspired by ancient indigenous traditions and ritual.
 
Sarah Zapata will also organize an event for Octopus on November 2 at 4pm.
 

Commissioned by Performance Space New York.

Photo courtesy of Deli Gallery.

All rights reserved by Performance Space New York
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