Octopus

 
Performers: quori theodor, Natalia Lassalle-Morillo, and Morena Espiritual
 
The octopus has nine brains, one located in its head and eight in its arms. Every arm senses the surrounding world and thinks with autonomy, and yet, each arm is part of the animal. Using this decentralized nervous system as an inspiration for Performance Space New York’s curatorial practice, the Octopus series invites artists and guest curators to individually organize an evening-length program with several artists working in any number of disciplines. Octopus continues Performance Space’s legacy of artist-centric programming and creating space for the exploration of ideas free from expectations.
 

Octopus: Taino Needle Science

 
Standing On The Corner Art Ensemble presents…
 
Taino Needle Science: Drone Acupuncture, a guerilla-style clinic introducing a new treatment modality for the present. Bringing together forms of minimalist music and the revolutionary detox acupuncture protocol known as “NADA” originated by Puerto Rican and Black community activists combating the heroin plague in the 1970s, Drone Acupuncture continues the search for alternative forms of treatment methods for marginalized and oppressed people; ones that are accessible, non-chemical, paired with political education, and committed to upholding the principle that the ability to choose and control one’s healthcare is a basic human right.
 
The clinic itself asserts that the chemical warfare waged against Black and Puerto Ricans did not prevail and calls all who are suffering to come receive Acupuncture! Set to the sounds of the Standing On The Corner Art Ensemble performing “Music for Acupuncture”, for Sextet and Prepared Piano.
 
“Taino Needle Science” is dedicated to the work and power of Dr. Mutulu Shakur, in collaboration with Walter Bosque del Rio (Young Lords, BAAANA) and Juan Cortez (NYHRE) administering the “People’s Protocol”.
 
 
About Octopus
The octopus has nine brains, one located in its head and eight in its arms. Every arm senses the surrounding world and thinks with autonomy, and yet, each arm is part of the animal. Using this decentralized nervous system as an inspiration for Performance Space New York’s curatorial practice, the Octopus series invites artists and guest curators to individually organize an evening-length program with several artists working in any number of disciplines. Octopus continues Performance Space’s legacy of artist-centric programming and creating space for the exploration of ideas free from expectations.

Octopus

 
Performances: Beaujangless and Chella Man
 
The octopus has nine brains, one located in its head and eight in its arms. Every arm senses the surrounding world and thinks with autonomy, and yet, each arm is part of the animal. Using this decentralized nervous system as an inspiration for Performance Space New York’s curatorial practice, the Octopus series invites artists and guest curators to individually organize an evening-length program with several artists working in any number of disciplines. Octopus continues Performance Space’s legacy of artist-centric programming and creating space for the exploration of ideas free from expectations.
 

This performance includes needle usage and themes around gender dysphoria.

Octopus

 
With: KCA, Sarai Frazier, Michael Hernandez, Žilvinas Jonusas, Sarazina Stein and Emily LaRochelle, Gallermic Mabuse, Wyatt Moniz, Noodt, Adrienne Swan, and Joey Truman.
 
The octopus has nine brains, one located in its head and eight in its arms. Every arm senses the surrounding world and thinks with autonomy, and yet, each arm is part of the animal. Using this decentralized nervous system as an inspiration for Performance Space New York’s curatorial practice, the Octopus series invites artists and guest curators to individually organize an evening-length program with several artists working in any number of disciplines. Octopus continues Performance Space’s legacy of artist-centric programming and creating space for the exploration of ideas free from expectations.


Octopus

 
With: Tess Dworman, Yvonne Meier, Tavish Miller, Anh Vo, Ogemdi Ude
 
The octopus has nine brains, one located in its head and eight in its arms. Every arm senses the surrounding world and thinks with autonomy, and yet, each arm is part of the animal. Using this decentralized nervous system as an inspiration for Performance Space New York’s curatorial practice, the Octopus series invites artists and guest curators to individually organize an evening-length program with several artists working in any number of disciplines. Octopus continues Performance Space’s legacy of artist-centric programming and creating space for the exploration of ideas free from expectations.
 

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